SEMINOLE OVERWHELMINGLY REJECTS PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES

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SEMINOLE OVERWHELMINGLY REJECTS PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES

Young voters find it extremely difficult to make a decision between the two candidates this election.

Young voters find it extremely difficult to make a decision between the two candidates this election.

Malavika Kannan

Young voters find it extremely difficult to make a decision between the two candidates this election.

Malavika Kannan

Malavika Kannan

Young voters find it extremely difficult to make a decision between the two candidates this election.

Malavika Kannan, Content Manager

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Young people are not as enthused with politics as their older counterparts, notorious for their low voter turnout. A poll conducted by the Seminole Newspaper shows that over half of the student body is unsatisfied with either of the major candidates running for president this year.

A random survey of 120 Seminole students showed that 53 percent chose “not satisfied’ with either candidate when presented alongside the options of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

AP Government teacher Robert Ash thinks this is related to the effect of media, which immortalizes candidate’s scandals in an age where millennials are more connected to technology than ever.

“There has been a shift in the way the game of politics is played,” said Ash. “Because of the Internet, nothing goes away anymore. Now we have YouTube and Wikileaks. We can watch the words coming out of [candidates’] mouths or read their emails. Things have changed.”

Students’ dismal outlook towards the election was reflected in anonymous comments written on the survey, which ranged from “I’d rather vote for a toaster oven” to “Either way we are doomed.”

Some students believe that such animosity stems from both candidates’ failure to inspire trust.

“Each candidate has both negative and positive qualities but differentiating them becomes increasingly difficult when new scandals keep happening and old ones are brought up again,” said sophomore Nidhi Ohri.

Hillary Clinton fared slightly better than her opponent, with 25 percent of Seminole’s vote compared to Donald Trump’s 22 percent.

“I believe Hillary is doing better than Trump [at our school] because Hillary does a better job at not insulting minorities, who make up a large demographic of our school,” suggested junior Jandrick Castro, Vice President of Young Politicians. “Hillary, though hardly at all, is more relatable to the common student than Trump, a braggadocious billionaire.”

However, party affiliations among Noles do not align with their presidential choices; 33 percent of students identify as Democrats and 29 percent identify as Republican, while only 38 percent identify as independents. Despite this, students from both sides of the aisle are united in their dislike for the candidates.

Both candidates have made attempts to woo millennial votes this election season such as being active on social media. Clinton has also adopted the policies of former presidential candidate Bernie Sanders. However, some believe that this is not enough of an effort to engage the youth who will play a critical role in determining who wins the election.

“Both candidates could appeal to the younger generation by appearing more genuine,” said junior Castro. “Millennials can read through [them] and know when a candidate is lying to their face; classic pandering does not work for us.”

Ash believes that national voting pattern will mirror Seminole’s with a victory for Clinton.

“Hillary is going to win,” Ash said. “That means more war for our young men and women to go die in or come back mentally and physically destroyed from. More money for Wall Street instead of affordable higher education and health care for graduating seniors. More fracking and other destructive fossil fuel activities that will continue the degradation of our environment.”

Regardless of who wins, this election has enormous potential consequences for the millennial generation, making it important that the candidates and millennials make an effort to connect with each other.

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